Monthly Archives: April 2018

A Foggy World Needs Lighthouses

Mike Pyatt

by Mike Pyatt

A Northeast newspaper editor, in1941, characterized Presidents Washington, Jefferson and Lincoln as “lighthouses in a foggy world.” Most Americans agree with that editor’s veneration. For those who genuinely love liberty, it’s more than symbolism. That trio stood as beacons in the midst of tumultuous, turbulent times. Few could deny that this world isn’t foggy on so many fronts. In the U.S., the towering health crisis of the day is the uncontrollable, deadly opioid epidemic. It leaves us in a malevolent fog, unable to stem the tide of this growing menace. Existential threats emanate from the Middle East, North Korea, and Russia, continuing to drain our coffers, and breech our reverie. We still slaughter nearly a million unborn annually. The U.S. sorely need statesmen, not politicians, who’ll take the helm, and intrepidly navigate these dangerous waters, that beset our “vessel of liberty” that’s listing perilously, taking on water. Is it too soon to lower the life boats? read more

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Coming To Grips With Choices

by Mike Pyatt

Mike Pyatt

Not easy ones like which movie to watch or flavor of ice cream. Strawberry or Pralines n’ Cream? But those that have substantial, long-term existential sway. The switch to E-trade seemed logical at the time. Which memory care for Mom? It’s those choices that interrupt our sleep, and unwillingly beckons disharmony and dissonance to our erstwhile sense of well being. Such events or circumstances shake our prior state of certitude, draining every fiber of our being, as our solace’s stolen from us, rapaciously. One feels more vulnerable and exposed when it’s linked undeniably to one’s agonizing choice. Freedom of choice doesn’t assure freedom from consequences. read more

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A Woeful Eulogy

by Mike Pyatt

Mike Pyatt

Feet propped upon the desk. Time for reflection. A brief respite from the rigors of life. Is it a way of life? A calling? Or less? Nineteenth Century French romanticist poet, and novelist, Victor Hugo, who wrote Les Miserables, and The Hunchback of Notre Dame, wrote, “To rove about, musing, that is to say loitering, is, for a philosopher, a good way to spend life.” He confirms that loitering isn’t merely a physical act, or the absence of action. It’s often a state of mind. The term, primarily pejorative, isn’t common in our vernacular. Yesteryear, it was routine in retail establishments, prominently posting a sign, “No loitering!” In some locales such comportment may be prohibited by ordinance, or have the full force of the law with a monetary fine, compulsory free ride to the edge of town, or a complimentary night’s lodging in the local hoosegow. Webster defines it, “to linger in an aimless way, spending time idly, without purpose.” German philosopher Von Goethe captured its essence, with a warning label, “Lose the day loitering, twill be the same tomorrow, and the rest more dilatory.” A nineteenth century term, albeit not an endearing, was a “lay about.” “A loafer, bum, or lazy; reluctant to move.” Today, objects of such disdain identify themselves as “cultural drifters.” read more

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