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No Time For Slumber

by Mike Pyatt

Mike Pyatt

Health experts maintain one needs a prescribed amount of sleep to function properly, though they differ on that threshold. We aren’t called to “slumber our life away.” Our 45th President appears to be like the Energizer Bunny, reportedly sleeping less than fours a night, and still going strong. Others get too much sleep. The Scriptures equate too much sleep or rest with slothfulness (Prov.6:9). The lesson’s clear-there’s a time for sleep, and a time to be watchful. Some may recall the record of Jesus rhetorically admonishing his soporific disciples, after previously entreating them to be on guard, “Are you still sleeping and resting?” Were they dullards? Obtuse? Would we have fared differently? Our nation has an unfortunate track record for sleeping when we should be watchful-missing critical signpost along the way. read more

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Troubling Soliloquy

by Mike Pyatt

Mike Pyatt

In quieter moments, when no one else’s around, one’s confronted with the reality that we’re troubled, at risk, by external and internal threats-those that routinely haunt one’s reverie. In the midst of constant murmur, that drones a disturbing message; our quotidian routine is insufficient to quell this troubling monologue as the contour of one’s existence changes constantly. We dwellers in remote geographic places like Wyoming, realize there exists a false sense of security in our vast expanse; a quixotic knee-jerk response that all is well. One learns that government-at any level-cannot safeguard us. That’s our domain. Another compelling reason the Second Amendment is so dear to Wyoming residents. Institutions nationally and worldwide, are vulnerable to mischief and maniacal mayhem. Schools react perilously with more “gun free zones.” Airports and public venues have become soft targets for radical terrorists intent on massacring as many as possible. There’s no sign of retreat. read more

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The Pliable Fourteenth Amendment Turned 150

by Mike Pyatt

Mike Pyatt

Happy 150th Birthday to the Left, from President Trump. Brent Kavanaugh. Legal pundits rant 24/7 about stare decisis. One needn’t be an attorney to understand the meaning of the stare decisis doctrine, a latin term meaning, “to abide by or adhere to decisions.” One may have to understand what it means today. The Left is apoplectic, warning of an apocalyptical threat if Kavanaugh’s confirmed. That’s code word to conservatives, “Don’t dare disturb the sacrosanct Roe v. Wade decision.” Another stark reminder of how the legal profession has strayed from its early common law moorings, relegating the principles of common law to the dust heap of history. read more

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Understanding What’s At Stake

by Mike Pyatt

Mike Pyatt

Canadian, Marshall McLuhan, media and communications scholar, in 1964, popularized, “The medium is the message,” coining terms of “hot” and cool” communications. He often quoted artists, politicians, statesman, and poets like Yeats, Whitman, Eliot, de Tocqueville, and Bacon, demonstrating how words impel one to think, feel and react. He stated the obvious, “Language is the main means of human communication,” understanding the transforming power of words, cinema and photos. The 1960 Kennedy-Nixon debates were defining moments in American politics, where substance, style, and visceral reactions moved a political nation as never before. At the time, CBS President, Frank Stanton, stated bluntly, “Kennedy was bronzed beautifully…Nixon looked like death.” Those watching the first TV debate declared Kennedy won by a landslide margin. Radio listeners gave a slight nod to Nixon. TV was “hot media.” Radio was “cool media.” Subsequent polls and surveys reflected the stark chasm between visual and listening audiences. Post debate newspaper coverage in1960, was balanced, suggesting not a landslide, but a slight edge to Kennedy. Most surveys lacked controls such as pre-debate preferences like party affiliation, religious preferences, education, etc., making it difficult to measure how much the debate altered pre-debate views. Roughly 88 per cent of households had TVs, compared to 10 per cent in1950. Demographically, most radio listeners were more rural, predominately Protestant, with a skewed bias against Catholic Kennedy. The role of the visual image was the singular difference in the first debate. read more

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Doing It Their Way!

by Mike Pyatt

Mike Pyatt

“For what is man, what has he got, If not himself, then he has naught, To say the things he truly feels, And not the words of one who kneels, The record shows I took the blows, And did it my way. Yes, it was my way.” Nearly fifty-years ago, Frank Sinatra recorded, “My Way,” a song written by former rock n roll heart throb, Paul Anka, in1967, specifically for Sinatra. That song has been played at funerals and President Trump’s inaugural ball, and covered by nearly every vocalist, from Elvis Presley to David Bowie. Anka reportedly said, “I’d never written something so chauvinistic, narcissistic, in-your-face and grandiose.” It personifies too many contemporary lives. We’ve seen this rerun-it’s not a comedy. read more

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