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Redolent of Self-Interest

by Mike Pyatt

Mike Pyatt

As adults, we’re unsurprised when one’s offspring is up front, asking, “What’s in it for me?” At least we can trot out our tawdry, “It’s not all about you,” speech that we’ve rehearsed just for this occasion, as we hastily eschew the #MeToo generation. Not so fast. In our search for a “public philosophy” that matches our much maligned “constitutional liberty” banner, we’re faced with this reality when we often begin our self-serving political profile for the “right candidate.” Whether it’s local government, State of Wyoming, or the national stage, many of us claim, “We want what’s best.” Just what do we mean? Do we mean the “common good?” Suddenly, we’re confronted with the fact that the “public good” is often at odds with “public opinion.” Listening to the recent Democrat debates, it’s abundantly clear that few, like our national electorate, understand the vital difference between a democracy and a republic. Our Founders would be woefully disappointed that their descendants have failed miserably on this front, using the two terms interchangeably at will, like epic and epoch, to our detriment and demise. read more

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Revisiting Evil

by Mike Pyatt

Mike Pyatt

Amid the El Paso and Dayton shootings, Democrat Presidential hopefuls slavishly offered another tawdry emotional appeal for stricter gun control. Like Chicago? The El Paso shooter reportedly wanted “to kill as many Mexicans as possible.” That 24 year old Dayton shooter didn’t survive despite wearing body armor. Both are white. White nationalist racists? Paid extreme anarchist? Mental Health crisis? Pundits scratch their head, scouring for an explanation that comports with motives palatable to a culture inclined to reject the possibility of absolute evil. They prefer pillorying “assault rifles” and “gaps” in background checks. Memories are short and selective. In a 1930’s Sears & Roebuck catalogue, one could purchase any of ninety-six rifles or shotguns, and it would be delivered to one’s door by the U.S. Postal Service. That continued until the late 1970’s. How many mass shootings do you recall during that 40 year span? What changed so dramatically? read more

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The Baby Bird Syndrome

by Mike Pyatt

Mike Pyatt

The Robin family moved into my wife’s hanging plant about a month ago. It has been both marvelous and humorous up close and personally observing the birthing process of baby birds. Neither of us are ornithologist, if so, we’d call them Turdus migratorius, a migratory songbird. We’ve learned a thing or two about Robin’s habits. Momma Robin rules the roost. She’s highly protective of the eggs she lay. Since God has created all life, one could anticipate some commonality with our winged creation. Mother and Father Robin work closely in this arrangement-a tag team approach-feeding and protecting. Once the first two hatched the real work commenced. Protection and nurturing, wholly engaged in anticipating the fuzzy little creatures every need. read more

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Towering Moral Problem of the Day

by Mike Pyatt

Mike Pyatt

My generation’s prone to be lugubrious when examining our shifting cultural and moral landscape, understanding the consequences of its end, if drastic measures aren’t forthcoming. It isn’t a generational curse, as it may appear. Younger citizens, who’ve assiduously contemplated that the erosion of individual liberty, reach similar conclusions, realizing one can’t ignore the obvious any longer. Others remain in their hermetically sealed world of obdurate denial. That magnificent book, “The 5000 Year Leap” chronicles 28 principles of liberty. That 2nd Principle, undergirds the grave concern of millions of liberty minded Christians and co-belligerents, “A free people cannot survive under a Republican constitution unless they remain virtuous and morally strong,” Benjamin Franklin warned. Anyone who’s astute of our current moral dilemma, and the precipitous slide toward decadence, must reject the flagrant hue and cry, “Don’t over-react, history runs in cycles…it will return.” One would be forced to ignore the plight of the Roman Empire, that discovered a human god, Caesar Augustus, “divinely appointed” was a poor foundation and Rome fell. This grand experiment called a Republic is precarious and vulnerable to mischief as the Founders solemnly warned. read more

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Other “Gods” Come And Go!

by Mike Pyatt

Mike Pyatt

Facedown. That’s where a massive 38 feet tall bronze covered statue of the “Goddess of Mercy” landed, after doing a face dive in Okinawa, Japan, that didn’t survive Typhoon Trami. Also known as “Mother of Mercy,” Buddhist statue Kannon Same, stood there to “answer request of her petitioners.” It had recently been bolstered by steel beams to survive such assaults. In Japan there’re at least 33 similar “posts of worship” of her likeness. She went the way all false gods go. Powerless and impotent, built by pagan hands, in garish defiance of the True and Living God. According to one Bible researcher there were more than one-thousand false gods in the Old Testament. Ancient Egypt had more than forty false gods. God sent plagues mocking their top ten idols. It’s well chronicled that Israelites were involved in idolatrous worship of such gods. At the foot of Mount Sinai, Israelites worshipped a golden calf, fashioned by Aaron, before Moses delivered the Ten Commandments, that expressly prohibited such idolatrous worship, cited in Exodus 20:3, ”You shall have no other gods before me.” In Paul’s Areopagus speech he referenced an inscription “To an unknown god.” Hindus in India still worship cows. According to Virgil, Augustus was divinely appointed. After 12 B.C. he became Pontifex Maximus. But a human god is a poor foundation and Rome fell. read more

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