A National Conversation On Race

by Mike Pyatt

Mike Pyatt

When Hammerin’ Hank Aaron shattered Babe Ruth’s MLB career home run record, on April 8, 1974, it was hailed as one of the biggest sports events of the century in Atlanta Fulton County stadium before more than fifty-thousand fans. Pearl Bailey sang the national anthem that day. Millions watched TV in anticipation. Typically Atlanta openers had 17 policeman on duty. That day there were 63. Aaron’s life had been threatened, before and after. He received hate mail for years because he was black. One letter exemplified the stark racism, “Dear (deleted) Henry, you are not going to break this record established by the great Babe Ruth if I can help it…Whites are far more superior than (deleted). My gun is watching your every black move.” Years later Aaron spoke out, “If I were a white man, all America would be proud of me,” he was quoted by the New York Daily News. “But I’m black. You have to be black in America to know how sick some people are. I’ve always thought racism a problem, even with the progress as America has made.” Is it, as Aaron remarked, a sickness? Is it contagious? Or is it ingrained in the heart to be expunged by legislation? read more

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Thanksgiving Proclamation by D.J. Trump

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

On Thanksgiving Day, as we have for nearly four centuries, Americans give thanks to Almighty God for our abundant blessings. We gather with the people we love to show gratitude for our freedom, for our friends and families, and for the prosperous Nation we call home.

In July 1620, more than 100 Pilgrims boarded the Mayflower, fleeing religious persecution and seeking freedom and opportunity in a new and unfamiliar place. These dauntless souls arrived in Plymouth, Massachusetts, in the freezing cold of December 1620. They were greeted by sickness and severe weather, and quickly lost 46 of their fellow travelers. Those who endured the incredible hardship of their first year in America, however, had many reasons for gratitude. They had survived. They were free. And, with the help of the Wampanoag tribe, and a bountiful harvest, they were regaining their health and strength. In thanks to God for these blessings, the new governor of the Plymouth Colony, William Bradford, proclaimed a day of thanksgiving and gathered with the Wampanoag tribe for three days of celebration. read more

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Who’d Skip Thanksgiving?

by Mike Pyatt

Mike Pyatt

Many know the presidential ceremony of “pardoning” the White House Thanksgiving turkey, dates back to the 1940’s. The other fifty million meet their fowl demise on our dinner tables. Since September 28, 1789, just before leaving for recess, on the same day the first Federal Congress passed the Bill of Rights, a resolution was approved, asking President Washington to recommend to the nation a day of Thanksgiving. Lincoln proclaimed in 1863, after expressing gratitude for a pivotal victory at Gettysburg, that the nation celebrate an official Thanksgiving Holiday on November 26, 1863. FDR, on November 26,1941, signed a bill establishing the last Thursday in November, as the modern holiday we now celebrate. With the historical underpinnings established, that day’s upon us again. For some, it’s another day off work. Few will skip the festive side of the day, and all the attendant activities. Those less fortunate, may find themselves in a local rescue mission or soup kitchen. Or, as a result of commerce, at some unfamiliar diner or truck stop. Sadly, some are left out in the cold-alone. read more

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Revisiting Lamentations

by Mike Pyatt

Mike Pyatt

For those unfamiliar with the writings of the late Dr. Francis A. Schaeffer, evangelical theologian and philosopher, who published twenty four books, with a central theme of revealed Biblical truth in our modern culture, a pivotal work, written in1969, Death in the City, against the backdrop of the 1960’s countercultural upheaval. It reads like today’s headlines nearly fifty thereafter. He contended there’s a inextricable link between the intellectual, cultural and spiritual orientation of society and impending death, physically and spiritually, when a society abandons a Biblical view of God, and Fallen man. The title of this compelling book parallels the writing of the Old Testament, The Book of Lamentations, attributed to the prophet Jeremiah, who lamented that death and destruction had devastated his beloved Jerusalem. read more

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